The First Few Days Post-Activation

A few more notes about activation day…

A question we got asked a lot on Facebook and through text messages was how Alex was reacting to sounds – the answer was that he wasn’t at all because his program was set so low. No big deal, but I was a little surprised because I hadn’t read that after activation, the users still don’t react to sound until after a few mappings. No big deal, though. Given his crying reaction, I’d rather he be eased into it rather than thrown into the deep end and hate it.

When we got home and put the processors on, it was pretty tough to actually keep them on his head. Cochlear ships their processors with Snugfits – they’re basically a piece of bendable plastic that hugs the ear to help keep it on.  It looks like this: 

They actually didn’t work HORRIBLY, but Shannon and I counted having to replace the magnets (aka coils) 15 times for Alex in the span of an hour and a half. The Snugfits worked reasonably well when he wasn’t doing anything too crazy, but the kid’s almost a year old; he’s doing a lot of crazy stuff, throwing himself around, standing up on things, etc. The Snugfits didn’t really stand up to that sort of abuse. Every time Alex reached up to his head, we expected the processor to come off. Worse, we couldn’t really pick Alex up and snuggle up with him without expecting that his processors were going to fly off.

This all added up to a lot of stress and felt familiar to the feeling we had when we were wrestling with his hearing aids, albeit not quite as bad due to the lack of feedback and the knowledge that unlike the hearing aids, that his CIs were ACTUALLY doing some real good for him. The stress inevitably lead to a few more conversations about how unfair this was to Alex. We felt relieved when he took a nap, because that was a break from watching his every mood and anticipating having to replace the equipment on his head.

At one point we tried using a headband that we’d read a lot about, called Hearing Henry. We tried using it with the Snugfits still installed, but we couldn’t get it to sit on his head correctly at the first pass so we gave up on it quickly in favor of just getting them back on his head. Shannon and I agreed to mess around with the headband after he went to bed to see if we could figure it out.

I’d say ignoring activation, day one was really about starting to get acclimated and process everything that had been given to us, starting with just keeping the things on his head.

 

Day 2

At the end of activation day, Shannon and I resolved to give the Hearing Henry headband another shot. This time, I removed the snugfits, and Shannon put the headband together. When Alex woke up, we threw it on his head, and… thank god.

I have nothing but good things to say about this thing. It holds the processors to Alex’s head and does it securely, so I’m no longer watching him every second and expecting to see a processor about to come loose, on the floor, in a mouth, or even worse, flat-out missing. The headbands weave the wire that connects to the coil (magnet) through them, which basically means that when the magnet falls off, it’s always generally in a position such that you can just flip up the magnet easily. Add it all up, and basically this piece of cloth has greatly made the CIs a lot easier to keep on Alex’s head, which is actually a huge deal.

This might be self-delusion talking, but I also find the headband to be sort of cute and maybe even less weird-looking than the snugfits. I’ll eventually post some pictures of what all of this looks like (I REALLY need to include the activation video on the activation post, derp), but I think Alex actually looks sort of cute with him on.

That said, there’s no doubt that he’s still wearing equipment on his head. You can clearly see the magnets are still there, and the processors are still visible. That’s completely fine with me, though, because it’s more functional and frankly, I’d rather Alex “own” his CIs than try to hide them, and instilling that in him starts by my leading by example as his parent. I’m already envisioning putting Bills / Sabres logos on them and the like.

After Alex’s first nap, we bumped him up to the second program on his CIs, which were a volume level up from the first. I was all ready to flip back to the first program if it proved to be overwhelming for him, but the kid handled it like a champ. I don’t think he so much as flinched. We experimented with loud noises to see if he’d react again, but no such luck. Not unexpected or disheartening in the least at this point, though. Speaking of reactions, though – Alex definitely lights up a little bit when we first put his processors on after he sleeps. So there’s no doubt that he’s getting some signal.

We decided to go out for lunch to get the kids out of the house. This was Alex’s first outing with his equipment and I was anticipating some double-takes and the occasional stare. I think Shannon was as well, but we didn’t really talk about it too much on the walk over. When we arrived, Alex definitely got some looks. I keep telling myself that 95% of the looks he’s going to be getting are from curiosity, especially because in my heart of hearts I’d probably do a double-take as well despite knowing what they actually are. All of the other parents on the CI board that we read say the same thing – that anxiety eventually just outright disappears. It’s the outright gawking and murmurs of “what’s wrong with him” and “OH MY GOD WHY DID YOU ABUSE YOUR CHILD WITH THOSE THINGS” crowd that makes me more leery, though. At the restaurant, we got a lot of looks, but it’s gotta be said that I was actively looking for them. Shannon did notice a mom and her daughter who were sitting behind me that were outright staring at Alex and making remarks to each other about it with gross looks on their face to the point where Shannon was staring back at them for a good 15 seconds and they didn’t notice.  Again, I get the looks, but… a little tact. I’m still formulating how I’m going to handle the stares. Right now, I think just stating “You’re staring.” in a loud, matter-of-fact tone is the leader, because it’s a simple observation, yet it’s loaded with embarrassment and shame. Ha. Regardless – I was proud that we put that milestone behind us.

That about wrapped up day 2. The headband did an awesome job and made keeping the CIs on a relative cinch which lead to a relatively stress-free day and we got the first outing behind us. I went to bed that night with a feeling that this would be doable for the next five years until Alex gets his next upgrade, which are practically guaranteed to be smaller / easier to deal with than these. Good feeling, big win, go team.

 

Day 3

Day three was rather unremarkable. In fact, I only have two bullet points written down – he flinched a little bit when we turned his CIs on again for the morning, and we moved up to program three. Shrug.

 

 

We’re now on day six and on the fourth program, which is right where our audiologist wanted us to be. We haven’t had any major struggles with the CIs dealing with them ourselves, and the headband has kept things completely sane. Tomorrow is Alex’s first day at daycare, though, so there’s definitely some anxiety over how that’s going to go. Shannon wrote a great one-pager for the ladies watching over him which basically equates to “Keep them on him when he isn’t sleeping and here’s how you get the headband on!” which is probably all that’s necessary at this point. We plan on asking the good teachers at Buffalo Hearing and Speech if they can stop in at daycare and show the ladies some more about them, like the programs, what the buttons on the processors do, troubleshooting, etc. I’m really hoping it goes well, but I have faith in the teachers there. They took outstanding care of Taylor when she was in that room and they’ve all been following Alex’s progress steadily so they’re clearly invested in him.

That catches us up. I’m stoked that Alex is no longer just floundering – he’s on his way to catching up. Every minute those CIs are on him, he’s building up his foundation to hearing and speech. Excited and grateful.

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A Little Relief

I got the call yesterday; the extended genetics panel came back CLEAR. Alex doesn’t have Usher’s or any other scary genetic syndrome. It’s a somewhat bittersweet victory because Shannon and I both feel like it was the antibiotic (gentamicin) that took Alex’s hearing from him, but  for me, the sweet outweighs the bitter. I’ve been terrified that Alex’s deafness was just a symptom of something bigger and worse, and now that’s basically gone.  Thank god.

The positive spin I’m putting on the antibiotic factor is this; if medicine took his hearing, it’s going to have to give it back to him as time goes on. I feel like because it appears that all Alex has to deal with is deafness and because of all of the developments happening on that front, he’s going to have the opportunity to take back what was taken from him.

Alex was supposed to be activated today if his surgery had gone through last month. To say that it’s a bummer that it didn’t happen is an understatement, but I’m very, very grateful for the clear genetics panel, so that helps to offset the frustration just a little.

That’s about all that’s going on, but I’m very, very happy to be writing this sort of update instead of what could have been the alternative.

Physical Therapy Update

Just wanted to throw up a quick note about the PT appointment we just had last night that we were worried about – it went great.

Our therapist came over and immediately noticed that Alex’s head-lean was much improved from when she had last seen him in February. She opened the session by asking if we had any questions or concerns, which we obviously did. She took a look at his head control and his muscle tone, and to our great relief, she said she didn’t see any issues with him. Hell, she didn’t even say that he was behind. He sat up very well and held it for about a full minute, which is what she was looking for.

Basically, he kicked ass. We asked specifically about seeing anything that remotely resembled Cerebral Palsy and she couldn’t find anything, and in fact she saw Alex doing things that would be contradictory to CP symptoms – the biggies were Alex’s muscle tone and the fact that he moves his limbs independently. It was a great relief to hear all of that.

I feel the need to write that our physical therapist is pretty awesome. She’s very well-spoken and clearly educated, and she also has a good bedside manner. When we told her what we were worried about, you could tell that she got it, that she understood our concerns, and that she was going to take the time to put our minds at ease as much as possible rather than just blowing it off with a “Nah, don’t worry about it.” She even told us about her own experience with one of her sons who had a low APGAR score and how she completely understood being scared of milestones and constantly wondering what sort of horrors were going to manifest. It’s nice to know that she could relate.

Alex isn’t PERFECT physically, and we have one or two things to work on, but our therapist assured us that these weren’t neurological issues, just bad habits that we’d want to correct early to help ensure that he’s going to keep up with his development. No problem. We’ll work on it.

Physical therapy was the biggy yesterday, but while I’m at it I’ll also bring up the audiology appointment we had yesterday. It was a very straightforward one. We came in, Alex’s ear molds were changed out to the new ones, and that was essentially it. Our next appointment is in April and we’ll actually be in a soundbooth to test Alex’s testing with his hearing aids. That’ll be interesting, but our expectations are really low. We doubt he’ll respond to much, and that doesn’t matter since CIs are such a different beast that his performance with the hearing aids will have no bearing on what he’ll get out of his CIs (little aside – a poster on our Facebook group showed a before and after audiogram of her child, who went from 100db loss to 10db, which is basically the difference between a jet flying by and something quieter than leafs rustling.  Amazing.).

Very relieving to have a good PT session yesterday. Now for the biggy, the MRI on Monday…

First Physical Therapy Session

Alex had his first PT session yesterday. I was A LITTLE nervous about how it was going to go. His PT evaluation really wasn’t that hot; nothing horrendous, but also pretty far from ideal. This was also our first therapy session, the first of what’s sure to be many, so there was that aspect to it as well.

Alex’s therapist arrived a few minutes early, introduced herself, and got right onto the floor with him. I got a very good from her which is obviously important if she’s to be on Alex’s dream-team of therapists and doctors. Very expressive, very nice, very talkative (she narrated everything she was doing, which was helpful for my note taking). Overall, she seemed to be very pleased with where Alex was. She DID notice that Alex prefers to look to his right side, but also stated that he only seemed to do that when he was laying down. Everywhere else and he was good to go.

She ran through a series of little exercises to do with Alex to help push him to his next set of monthly milestones, one of which includes sitting and mastery of rolling over. Throughout every exercise she emphasized the importance of giving Alex the least amount of help possible to keep him stable to coax him to use his own muscles, and instead of PLACING him into spots, to TRANSITION him into spots. Example – for tummy time, instead of picking him up and placing him directly on his belly, it’s much more helpful to use a toy to try to get his attention and direct it to one of his sides, then coax his hip in that direction to try to get him to initiate a roll. It all sounds like pretty obvious stuff, but hearing and seeing the exercises really drove it home. It also helped that Alex was clearly getting tired from the activity, so I knew he was working.

But by far, the best part of the appointment was when the therapist told us that Alex was doing fine developmentally from the PT spectrum of things, and nearly verbatim, “If this was Alex’s evaluation he probably wouldn’t have been recommended for physical therapy.” That was huge. Not only does it represent some sort of win for him, but it’s also a positive sign that he doesn’t have any other physical symptoms that have manifested, at least yet. I also asked about his balance – she said it was fine, he had no issues. Great stuff.

That was about the end of it. She did say that it might be beneficial to increase the therapies from monthly to bi-weekly once development started picking up more, the basis of it being that she can catch things earlier, monitor progress more often, and that there are basically a higher amount of milestones that will start happening. I’m not explaining it here as well as she did, but Shannon and I both agreed that it made sense if we got to that point.

We have an appointment with her for next month and obviously hope that Alex performs as well for that as he did here.

Now to see if we can get his other therapists into the picture…