General Early Intervention Status

I thought I’d write about how all of our early intervention stuff has been going, just to give an idea of what it’s been like. Our focus had definitely been on getting the health insurance on board with the June date, so writing about these sort of fell by the wayside.

I guess the first thing to say here is that they don’t feel terribly inconvenient or time-obtrusive. I was worried about that when we first set out, but it really hasn’t been too bad. A lot of that is probably because I have a relatively flexible work schedule and our therapists have been awesome about coming either first thing in the morning or after I already get home, so even though we typically have one or two therapy sessions a week, they basically just eat up home-time, so no big deal. And of course, we’re always interested in picking their brains about what they’re looking for, what else we can be doing with Alex, bounce questions… so yeah. Even though I cringed when I had first read about having appointments all of the time, I’m pretty happy to say at this point that it hasn’t really been a big deal overall. All of our therapists are awesome and we welcome all of their help and experience.

Breaking it down…

 

Physical Therapy:

We’re still doing PT once a month. They go for about an hour. Our PT generally starts by asking us if we have any concerns, which we almost have. Once you have a kid who has one disability / issue / whatever you want to call it, everything that you would’ve otherwise written off as him just being a weirdo or taking his time becomes something new to worry about and research. So, as a result, whenever our PT asks us that question, we usually have something for her. Luckily, Alex has been doing well, in general. His balance is solid, he’s sitting up for decent pieces of time, etc.

After the PT finishes up “testing” for whatever concerns we had, which she explains in great detail, she takes Alex through the paces for everything we didn’t ask about and asks questions, usually in the form of “Has he done x yet?” An important thing she told me during our last PT session that probably would’ve saved me some stress if I had known it before – when you see PT guidelines like “Can sit up without support for 30 seconds,” they mean “Has demonstrated that he can sit up for 30 seconds” and not “consistently sits up for 30 seconds.”

After that, she goes through what she’ll be looking for at next month’s appointment and shows us exercises that we can work on with him to help push him along the path. The mantra remains to give him enough of a push that he can succeed but as little as necessary to make sure he’s working for it.

Once we get toward the end of our time, she writes down all of the exercises that we should be working on with him, and that’s that. She always tells us that we should feel free to text / call her with any questions, and she’s been great in that regard. We’ve only used that once when we were really concerned, and she got back to us very quickly.

Once Alex hits ten months of age or so and things really start picking up with crawling / walking, we might bump our appointments up to an every other week type thing. Our time with our PT is always very educational and often calming, so at this point I have no issue with doing that to make sure that Alex keeps pushing forward. But overall, he’s been pretty solid in the PT department. He’s not as far along as his older sister Taylor was, but he’s not showing anything that concerns our PT. So far, so good.

 

Teacher of the Deaf:

These are every other week and only go for about a half hour. Because our TOD actually works at the deaf-oral school Alex will be going, our sessions generally started as a “here’s what’s going to happen once he gets implanted and once he starts going to school” type thing. I think she wasn’t expecting us to have researched as much as we had in advance – we’ve gotten that a few times. Anyhow, the past three or four of our meetings have followed the same pattern. The TOD brings a bag of toys with her and works on getting Alex interested in one toy at a time. The toy generally “does something” – i.e., it’ll be a ball that has a button which causes it to light up, or a car that she’ll drive up to his face, but the idea is that there’s an action associated with the toy. Her goal has been to get Alex to make eye contact to signify that he wants that action to happen to. He’s been great in this area. When Shannon and I feed him solids, most of the time we won’t give him his next spoonful of food until he makes that eye contact, so he’s used to this. I have a feeling these meetings are going to pick up after he gets his implants, which I’m excited for, because right now Alex isn’t really being pushed. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, because we’re both grateful that he’s nailing the eye contact thing, but it’s going to be really cool when we can start having him use his new ears to vocalize to get those toys to move or whatever the next step ends up being.

 

Speech Therapist:

The speech therapist’s visits are pretty familiar to the TOD’s at this point. She comes every other week for a half hour.  She usually first asks us how Alex is doing with his hearing aids, whether or not we see him reacting to any sound, and if we’re having any issues with keeping them on his ears. After the quick status update she starts working with Alex. Like the TOD, she also brings toys, but they’re various animals. She works on getting Alex to make eye contact and then making the animal sound (“A doggy says woof woof woof”). Again, not really too much happens here. Alex watches intently, but you can tell that he’s not going to really maximize his value here until he gets his CIs. We’re really looking forward to his speech therapy sessions as one of the goals we have for Alex is to get him talking as early as possible and hopefully work on any affect he might start out with.

So there it is. We’re getting excited to REALLY get Alex going in a few months and teach him how to use his new ears and we’re thrilled with the supporting cast around us.

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