Some more random tidbits

A lot has happened lately, so this is probably a good time to write about some of the stuff that’s fallen between the cracks.

Alex is still moving along at a good clip with his physical development. We were worried that he was developing a flat head, but he’s been doing much better with sitting up with a little bit of help and we almost never have him flat against the floor anymore. None of that would really be an actual health concern anyhow unless it got REALLY bad, but it’s still a mini-win for us that the flat spot is going away.

Speaking of physical therapy, Alex had another PT appointment last night. Not way too much to say there – he’s still on track for his age, and it was reiterated to us again that if Alex was to be evaluated today, he likely wouldn’t be a candidate for PT services. We still have a list of things to work on to help ensure that he hits his milestones for next months, but there’s nothing we really have to get him caught up on. The only thing that the therapist noted was that he still has a little bit of a side preference when it comes to leaning his head, so she encouraged us to hold Alex on his side so that the opposite side of his head is propped up a little bit higher to stretch that neck muscle a bit. No big deal, though.

His eye contact is fantastic. One of his favorite games to play is to stare up at one of us. When we make eye contact back (especially if we make a silly face at him), it’s almost a guaranteed smile. Eye contact is a good sign that he doesn’t have some other issues that we’re obviously hoping to avoid. Our speech therapist even noted that his eye contact is great and that he reacts very well to his environment. Great, and reassuring that we haven’t seen any signs of anything else coming.

We still haven’t gotten the results of Alex’s genetics testing. That should be coming this week. It’s very likely we won’t learn anything from it at all, except for what it possibly isn’t. Because of that, it’s nice to have our therapists telling us that they aren’t seeing anything else going on, at least yet. It makes me nervous to think about. I have a bad feeling we’ll get back some sort of result that’s full of “this MIGHT happen, and this MIGHT happen…” sort of stuff that will just make us worry. But as Shannon often tells me, it’s important that we stay in front of as much as we can, and she’s right.

On the techy front, I’ve been excited about a recent MIT development that’s resulted in a CI proof of concept that’s completely internal. It’s a pretty slick design – the microphone resides in the middle ear, which effectively means that the acoustics of the users ears come into play, which is a little more natural. Obviously the coolest things about this design are really the invisible equipment and not having to worry about any of the downsides of that equipment. I think the big downsides to it would be that it would require a surgery to upgrade the hardware, though. Their design still uses an electrode to stimulate the cochlea instead of something like infrared (tens of channels of sound vs. HUNDREDS). That tech is a ways off, though, but the fact that they have a newer internal implant is awesome. I’m hoping that the model that we see for the internal implants involves a processor that’s still external, but much smaller than current processors (something like this, but preferably even smaller). Cochlear has an internal CI that’s been in testing for the better part of ten years now, and actually has two modes of operation – one that works completely using internal components, and one that works in conjunction with external processors. The former is the better sound, but the idea is that it isn’t required to be able to hear anything. I think that’s a great model to allow for upgrades as we go along without requiring surgery. A happy medium will be found.

Outside of that wall of techno-babble, I’m really thrilled that so much work is going into bringing such amazing advances that Alex and others will hopefully be able to use. Just thinking about him not having to worry about batteries or swimming or roller coasters or worrying about getting double takes makes me smile.

I recently asked our CI board about if and when they introduced ASL to their children. There was definitely some spirited dialogue generated from it, because it’s such a huge part of the strategy a lot of these parents used for coping with their child’s deafness. The thread is up to about 50 responses right now, and they’re all great in that everyone’s story was basically one of success, and they were just sharing their particular recipes. A lot of really interesting points were made both for and against teaching ASL prior to and during speech therapy. The one I found most convincing was that some children found it easier to use spoken language because they were already familiar with the concept of the words that they had learned from ASL. No one stated that ASL got in the way, but obviously it’s still a small-ish sample size. On the other side of the coin, there were many parents who posted that their children were oral-only and that their kids had no interest with learning sign language after their therapy. Cool to see that level of confidence placed in hearing / oral skills as the sole means of communication (minus writing and finger-pointing, of course!).

I think what I got out of the discussion is that there isn’t a clear-cut right or wrong answer, but it looks like ASL wouldn’t really get in the way of verbal development. I don’t think our current strategy of introducing ASL during or after Alex’s therapy is really going to change, but now I think the reasoning for that is going to be more about not inundating the guy with therapy and new things to learn instead of ASL impeding his verbal skills.  It’s still a tool that I still want him to have, though.

I think that about covers it! It’s been a busy week and we’re still figuring out Alex’s hearing aids, but I’m happy with the progress that we’re making.

I was telling Shannon that I have this future image of my head of having some of Alex’s buddies from his oral school come over to watch a movie in our home theater that we’re going to eventually put together (closed captioning, of course!), spoiling them with pizza and pop, and generally running around like the normal kids they truly were. Their parents could be upstairs with us exchanging our war stories of our respective journeys, how much we worried, how much work it all was. It’s a simple little scenario, but it gives me a lot of hope that everything will end up alright and that we’re just in a really tough stretch right now, just gotta keep plugging away.

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One thought on “Some more random tidbits

  1. monrovia was at oral school from 7 months-4 years old. out of all of my friends there, we all agreed we wished we had done more asl. we were discouraged early on from doing it by professionals, but our kids were also the youngest ones implanted at that point, and their language development was so much more natural than it has been for later identified kids. we still use it now and again in a crowded room, across the classroom, when i’nm trying to remind her to say thank you or please, sit down or be nice, etc. without saying it outloud.
    as for your movie scenario? i can tell you from many playdates with our little buddies, especially our daughter’s deaf friends, that it is always so fun to hear our crazy loud, silly, happy kids, racing around, whispering! to each other, watching a movie, belting out songs…while we parents talk about life. it’s always one of my favorite times.

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