First Appointments: Teacher of the Deaf / Speech Therapist

I’m way behind on writing. In some ways, I think it’s a good thing, because I originally started this off as just a place to vent off steam. As things have sort of calmed down and we’re not in complete terror / panic / depression mode, I’ve had less steam to vent. Regardless, we’re still very busy, still a lot going on. I have a lot to write about, so maybe I’ll try out this blog scheduler thing and tear a few blogs out right now.

A few weeks back, we had our first appointments with two more of Alex’s early intervention people; his teacher of the deaf and speech therapist. They’ll both be working on different things with Alex, even though the gigs seem very similar.

Starting with the teacher of the deaf – as is with all of our early intervention team, all of Alex’s therapies will either be at our house or at his daycare. I had a LITTLE bit of trepidation over this one initially, partially because I wasn’t sure what to expect. I thought this might actually be a deaf adult who would teach us some of the ropes and maybe push ASL as the only thing Alex should be working on right now or something (if you don’t know, the existence of CIs is a source of great consternation among some of the more… passionate… members of the Deaf community). I didn’t want to feel pressured to go that particular way. At the time, I knew that my fears were probably ridiculous. Our Early Intervention coordinator knew what our goals were, knew we had already expressed great interest in the speech center’s oral-based program, and that any teacher who was too militant about pushing toward an ASL-only route would probably not jive well with us.

I’m happy to report that my trepidation was a complete waste of energy. As it turns out, our TOTD is actually the main teacher at the oral school we want to send Alex to! That’s huge, since Alex will be with her all the way up until kindergarten (assuming, as always, that he’s eligible for cochlear implants). She works with the kids in the program all of the time, she’s seen what works well and what doesn’t, so to have her involved early and often is huge.

As far as the content of the first meeting with her, it was sort of introductory boilerplate kind of stuff. She told us about her, what she did with the kids at school, schedules, and the general things we would work on. A lot of good info exchanged. Some of my favorite tidbits that came out of it:

  • The kids at the school get live music therapy once a week. Cool to see that the school doesn’t take the attitude of some of the more negative or older opinions of CIs in that their users can’t enjoy music.
  • Unlike Auditory Verbal Therapy, which seems to be the most common sort of therapy done with children who get implants to learn to communicate orally primarily, the system that her school uses doesn’t discourage lipreading as a tool. AVT has had a great amount of success (we see it on the Facebook parent board all the time), but I think lipreading is a tool. I don’t want Alex to lean on it too much, but if he uses it to get a little help in understanding what’s being said in loud environments, I’m all for it.
  • That said – the school DOES emphasize listening as much as possible. Our teacher told us that they regularly ensure that the kids are listening by calling their names and asking them questions when they’re not looking, for example.
  • She likes that Alex is in daycare for a few days a week – it’s good practice to listen in louder environments as well as good for socialization skills (some kids who are hard of hearing have obstacles here).

Overall, it was great meeting her. Shannon and I both liked what she had to say as well as her personality. It’s also great that we’ll be able to ask her any questions we might have about the oral school since she’s probably in the best position to answer.

Now for the speech therapist – I obviously had a clearer idea of what she’d be working on, so I wasn’t too worried about how that would go. Our first meeting with her was relatively uneventful. You could tell that she walked into the house assuming that we didn’t really know too much about CIs / hearing aids and their effects on speech. She came armed with a lot of knowledge on CIs, but we actually knew most of it already. It was no problem, of course – she probably got a good feel for what we know already. We’re really looking forward to working with her, of course. Oh – she’s ALSO on the staff of the oral school that we’re hoping Alex will attend. Past that, not way too much to say. Shannon and I both liked her as well. She was a bit more down-to-business, but I appreciate that quality for her gig. All-in-all, that was a pretty uneventful meeting, but those will get more interesting as some time goes on.

So there’s the team, all assembled. I like who we’ve got, and I feel that Alex is going to be in good hands.

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