A Relatively Quiet Week

There isn’t much going on in the way of news, but I felt like writing something out and keeping momentum. We don’t have any appointments this week! I was telling Shannon that I both like that and feel anxious about it. It’s nice to get a little bit of a break, but I also want to keep things moving. We’ve just about maxed out what we can do at this point, though – the genetics appointment is next week, early intervention is probably tearing through all sorts of paperwork and getting our therapy team lined up, and our ENT doesn’t have much for us until Alex can get his MRI done in March.

Despite the lack of appointments, we’ve been busy working with Alex on the minor issues that the physical therapist identified – neck strength and favoring his right side. Shannon and I have been very diligent on giving Alex plenty of tummy time, which has paid off well. Only a week later and he’s clearly MUCH better at getting his neck up nice and high, even if he’s still a little bit wobbly. We’ve also done a lot of work to encourage Alex to move his head to the left. That typically involves putting him on his side a bit so that gravity helps to push his head to the left (especially when sleeping) and putting him on the floor such that whatever action is occurring (Taylor playing with toys, the TV, mommy / daddy) is to his left. This has also paid off. He may still be favoring his right side, but at the very least it’s less noticeable at this point. Shannon and I hope to keep at it and see how much improvement we can get out of Alex before his PT appointment. Shannon has done some great research on head bobbling, and she’s identified that as an area we’ll still want to work on. According to what she’s seen, most kids’ heads generally stop bobbling by four months, so we only have a few weeks to get Alex to that point. I think that overall, we’re making great progress with working on Alex to address the issues the physical therapist brought up. It’s nice to see results!

A cool thing that I forgot to mention out of the audiology appointment we had last week was that part of the oral school’s “curriculum” includes a music class. I LOVED hearing about that. Shannon and I are both relatively musical people. Our favorite game of all time is probably Rock Band, we both like musicals, and we commonly have music playing in the background when we’re home. Taylor’s also quite the little singer.

Among the many things that hit me hard with Alex’s diagnosis was that he wouldn’t be able to appreciate that as much with us because he’d either be unassisted-deaf or be using cochlear implants (which currently aren’t known for being great with music). To hear that the school does any element of music therapy was wonderful, because it will be catered toward kids like Alex and it implies that, contrary to a lot of older stuff you’ll read on the internet, music isn’t useless noise to some of these kids. I can’t end this paragraph without also mentioning that there’s good stuff coming down the pipe for music comprehension through cochlear implants, too. I’m excited to know that Alex might be able to join his family of music appreciators. Shannon and I both want so much for him to enjoy Christmas music with the family next year.

On the topic of implants, I’ve still been doing a lot of research on implants so that if we’re eligible, we’ll know which direction we want to go and not feel rushed. At this point, I think we’d lean toward the Cochlear Nucleus 6 system. There are lots of good reviews from both adult users as well as parents of kids who use them that indicate that they sound “fuller” than previous models and that they also do wonderfully in noise compared to previous models. They’re also splash-proof! We like what we’re reading about them so far, and it helps that Cochlear owns something like 65% of the market. Technogeek note – they’re also the company who are known to be testing the fully-internal implant that I really, really want Alex to eventually get.

Despite all of the optimism and hope I think I’ve been showing here, it’s still really sad to know that our hopes, at least for the interim, will still involve Alex having a very obvious apparatus on his head. We’ll often read posts from parents on the boards discussing their strategies for dealing with when people ask about what the implants are (with varying degrees of politeness), and it just sucks to know that Alex will have to deal with that for an appreciable amount of time. The term “it’s just not fair” has been used quite a bit in our household. We’re still very grateful that the opportunity to experience sound and speech will be available to Alex, of course, but it sometimes pains me to look down at his perfect little head and know that, in some way, it’s going to be “spoiled.” When Alex gets his hearing aids, I’m sure that those shallow concerns will fade into the background if we know that he’s getting sound, but it’s sad to contemplate in the present.

What else… I think Shannon and I have found that it’s becoming much easier to talk about Alex’s hearing loss in a more matter-of-fact sort of manner without getting emotional about it. We went to a family party and Shannon brought the topic up very smoothly (everyone was probably wondering about it but afraid to ask), and we gave a general update regarding what we were hoping was going to be coming down the road. Being able to do this without getting measurably sad might not sound like much, but it’s a small victory and one that we’ll take.

Last interesting thing of note – Shannon has been visiting Alex at daycare during her lunch hours at work. It works out pretty well because her office is only a few minutes away from Alex’s daycare, it gets her some extra time with him that includes a little bit of physical therapy, and it also shows the good ladies who work there what sort of things we’re working on with Alex. During conversation with the teachers in Alex’s room, one of the teachers revealed that she has a daughter with hearing loss as well. Though hers was not enough to qualify for cochlear implants, she DID say that she has all kinds of experience dealing with hearing aids that have fallen out or are squealing, and so she can certainly help out when Alex gets his as well as be the go-to person for other teachers if Alex has any problems. Since we still haven’t found a nanny yet, that’s significantly comforting! One of our fears with leaving Alex in daycare is that we won’t be able to emphasize enough to the teachers how important it will be to keep his hearing aids / speech processors on or that they won’t know how to do it, so knowing that there’s a pro in the school really helps to alleviate that concern.

I think that about wraps it up for now – happy holidays!

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One thought on “A Relatively Quiet Week

  1. Music is absolutely something that he can enjoy, no matter what the future holds 🙂 ! I have a best friend who lost her hearing at age three, and ironically, her parents were professional musicians for the metropolitan opera in NYC. She took dance and was amazing! I’m biased, but I think she was the best in our college modern dance group – they put some woofers or some such speaker thing to the floor and she kept time that way, along with taking cues from the dancers around her…she got a cochlear implant last year and hearing lyrics is one of her new favorite things. Hang in there! ~ Kate

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